Sacraments

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The Scarament of Baptism

 

 

 

 

Baptisms have resumed in the parish. Only one child can be baptised at any one ceremony. Please contact the parish office on 028 9064 2446 to book a convenient date.

The secretary will pass on your name and contact information to Sister Jacinta who is responsible for the preparation for this important sacrament. To welcome your baby into our parish community, Sister Jacinta will contact you and arrange to visit you at home about a week before the baptism.

During the visit, she will explain the symbols of the ceremony, give you a parents' booklet to help you prepare for this important family event and answer any questions you may have.

Sponsors of Baptism

Sponsors are often referred to as the child's "godmother" or "godfather". The sponsor accepts the responsibility of helping the person grow in the Catholic Faith. They must be at least 16 years old and must have a lifestyle that demonstrates their faith is strong enough to fulfil the responsibilities involved in being a sponsor. The child may have only one godmother and one godfather. Another person involved becomes a witness.

"By Baptism we become members of the Church, the Body of Christ. We share in the priesthood of Christ as well as his prophetic and royal mission. We enjoy the community we find in the church, share our talents and gifts with its members, respond willingly to its teachings and requirements and assume responsibilities that our membership implies." (Pg. 213 Irish Catholic Catechism for Adults.)

The Sacrament of Penance

 

The Sacrament of Penance reconciles us with God. The whole power of the Sacrament of Penance consists in restoring us to God's grace and blessing and joining us with him in an intimate friendship. (CCC No. 1468)

Jesus himself said, 'Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven.'

In this way Jesus instituted the sacrament of reconciliation. Why do we need this sacrament? Can we not just go to God in prayer and ask for forgiveness? We can ask God for forgiveness as individuals. But we are also members of Christ's Body, the Church. When we sin we sin not only against God but against the Church community. The priest represents not only Christ but also the Church community. When he says the words of absolution, the sinner is reconciled not only with God but with the whole Church community.

In preparation for the celebration of the sacrament, we need to examine our conscience and honestly face up to our wrong-doing. There must also be a genuine desire to amend our lives and a resolution not to sin again. Once we have confessed our sins, the priest requires us to carry our a penance that will help us grow in faith, hope and charity.

The Sacrament of Reconciliation is normally available after 10.00 am and 7.30pm Masses on weekdays. There is a station of confession from 7.00 pm until 7.30 pm each Friday evening and a station of confession from 12.00 noon to 1.00 pm every Saturday. There are two Penitential services in the course of the year, one before Christmas and one before Easter.

The Eucharist

 

 

 

At the same time we give ourselves to Christ so that we can be united to him as members of his Body, the Church. In the Eucharist we are transformed into the Body of Christ. Our transformation is a life long journey in which we become more like Christ, seeing others as he does, and having a heart like his heart; a heart full of love and compassion for the world. At the end of the Eucharist we are sent out with the following words - "Go and announce the gospel of the Lord." It is a reminder to us that we are to play our part in transforming our families, communities, society and world with faith, hope and love in our hearts. In this way, Jesus sends us our to 'live the Eucharist' in our daily lives for the good of all people and all creation.

In our Parish, children receive the Eucharist for the first time during their Primary Four year at school. The are prepared for this sacrament by their parents and teachers and are invited to participate in the 'Do this in Memory' children's Masses which take place in the course of their Primary Four year at school. These occasions are important in giving first communicants an understanding of the importance of the Eucharist in their lives. These Masses are celebrated once each month leading up to the First Communion Day and parents are involved in preparing the liturgy for each Mass.

The Sacrament of Confrimation

 

 

 

 

 

 

The sacrament of Confirmation completes Baptism. Anyone who freely decides to live a life as God’s child and asks for God’s Spirit under the signs of the imposition of hands and anointing with chrism oil receives the strength to witness to God’s love and goodness in what they say and do. When we choose to be confirmed we are committing ourselves to grow in our friendship with Father, Son and Holy Spirit. We are saying, “ Yes, I believe in you my God; I wish to receive the gift of your Spirit so that I can witness to your love and presence in the world all the days of my life.” and God says, “Yes I believe in you too and I will give you my Spirit. I give myself entirely to you. I am all yours!

In our parish we normally have Confirmation conferred on our P7 children at 4pm on an afternoon during the month of February. Children are prepared for this sacrament by the teachers in our Catholic primary schools and during the months prior to receiving the sacrament they are made very much aware of what it means to be a committed follower of Christ. The Service of Light, celebrated a number of months before Confirmation, highlights this commitment and during this service parents are encouraged to help their son/daughter understand the importance of the sacrament.

The Sacrament of Marriage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The sacrament of Confirmation completes Baptism. Anyone who freely decides to live a life as God’s child and asks for God’s Spirit under the signs of the imposition of hands and anointing with chrism oil receives the strength to witness to God’s love and goodness in what they say and do. When we choose to be confirmed we are committing ourselves to grow in our friendship with Father, Son and Holy Spirit. We are saying, “ Yes, I believe in you my God; I wish to receive the gift of your Spirit so that I can witness to your love and presence in the world all the days of my life.” and God says, “Yes I believe in you too and I will give you my Spirit. I give myself entirely to you. I am all yours!

In our parish we normally have Confirmation conferred on our P7 children at 4pm on an afternoon during the month of February. Children are prepared for this sacrament by the teachers in our Catholic primary schools and during the months prior to receiving the sacrament they are made very much aware of what it means to be a committed follower of Christ. The Service of Light, celebrated a number of months before Confirmation, highlights this commitment and during this service parents are encouraged to help their son/daughter understand the importance of the sacrament.

The Sacrament of the Sick

The sacrament imparts consolation, peace and strength to the sick person. In some cases the sick person recovers from their illness. However, if God is calling the sick person home to heaven, the Sacrament of the Sick helps to prepare the sick person for the physical and spiritual battles ahead on their final journey. In any case, the Anointing of the Sick has the effect of forgiving sins. Only bishops and priests can administer the sacrament, for it is Christ himself who touches and blesses the sick person, in and through the actions of the bishop and priest by virtue of their ordination.

Housebound parishioners receive the Sacrament of the Sick usually during the first week of each month, though with an increasing number of housebound parishioners this is not always possible. People who are going into hospital, or who have become seriously unwell my receive the sacrament upon request.

Each year, the Parish celebrates a special Mass for the Sick. It usually takes place in St Joseph's College, Ravenhill Road. During this Sunday celebration, those present may receive the Sacrament of the Sick. This lovely occasion helps build up the faith of the community itself.

In the final analysis the sacrament 'completes our identification with Jesus Christ' that was begun at our Baptism. Its grace and power fortify us in our final struggles before we go to the father's house. (Irish Catholic catechism for Adults. Pg. No. 285)

The Sacrament of Holy Orders

 

Holy Orders is the sacrament through which the mission entrusted by Christ to His apostles continues to be exercised in the Church until the end of time. In the Sacrament of Holy Orders, or Ordination, the priest who is ordained vows to lead other Catholics by bringing them the sacraments (especially the Eucharist), by proclaiming the Gospel and by providing other means to holiness.

Prayer for Vocations

Dear God, we ask you to inspire men and women to respond generously to your call and embrace the gift of their vocation. Bless them with the joy that comes through loving service. We pay in union with the communion of saints in the name of Jesus, your son. Amen.

Parish Contacts

Parish Office

Fr. Hickland